Southampton, Easthampton video production company explains what to expect during a video shoot

If it were at all possible, we would bring our little springer spaniel to the set. I can assure you she’ll take your mind off any fears that you may encounter during the video shoot. She LOVES people.

Southampton, Easthampton video production company explains what to expect during a video shoot

Clearly the most important part with respect to client expectations is the final video production result. In other words, what will the video look and feel like once it has been completed.

However, one of the other main areas of concern for web video clients is the video shoot. Clients are sometimes worried about what they will have to do on camera. It’s sort of like the fear of public speaking which is a common fear among most people.

Therefore, as professional videographers, one of the main objectives of our video production team when working with New England businesses  on  a video shoot is to make the client feel as comfortable as possible. I completely understand that once the camera and lights go on,  raw nerves can override any plans and interview preparations.  But we are experienced in helping clients overcome any discomfort.

OK, let’s get started: For example, when our team arrives on location, we typically take the extra time to explain each step while we are setting up for an interview. We explain where we will set up the interview and why. The explanations help relieve any nervousness in front of the camera when they understand each step of the process. We try to eliminate the fear of the unknown during the video production.
Our video production team also leaves plenty of time for questions before a single word is ever spoken on camera.

If it were at all possible, we would bring our little springer spaniel to the set. I can assure you she’ll take your mind off any fears that you may encounter during the video shoot. She LOVES people.  But obviously, we can not bring our dog to the video shoot – that’s just not practical (hence the lovely photo of our dog).

Additionally, when we first arrive, we need to get a sense of the space and location before any setup begins. Typically, the person that we are about to work with on camera will show us the office, introduce us to various people in the office, and explain the various aspects of the business. Much of our discussion will have already been covered during pre-production planning but it’s always helpful to review the process prior to the video shoot. By this time, any nervousness begins to dissipate and they begin to get a sense of comfort and even fun. Yes, our clients across Massachusetts, Vermont, and Connecticut have repeatedly told us they enjoyed the process tremendously – despite earlier nervousness.

While one of our videographers or production assistants speaks with a member of the staff (getting release forms signed, reviewing interview questions), we have at least one or two additional video production team members who are getting the video equipment in place – many times that me 🙂

Once everyone is fairly comfortable and the equipment has been set up, we will provide the client with a wireless microphone and then we proceed to an audio and visual test. Fairly straight forward. Next step, the actual interview.

Lights On, Camera Rolling, and ACTION!
The interview typically  resembles a conversation between two people and after the first few minutes the conversation pretty much flows. The camera person and director stay pretty much in the background and let the interview/conversation run its course. We have done hundreds of interviews and know what to ask to get just the perfect responses. In most scenarios, interview questions have been provided to the client well in advance to provide them with an opportunity to prepare for the interview. It is not recommended to read answers from a script, but I do recommend preparing the answers mentally prior to the actual video shoot. If a teleprompter is required – we can help and set up the text in a teleprompter.

After the interview has been completed, we typically like to take B-roll footage. B-roll footage refers to the kind of video footage that helps tell the digital video story. We film the location of your business, the building, the office, maybe some staff members interacting with each other, I think you get the idea. We choose unique and creative camera shots and angles.  B-roll footage is very important to help tell the story visually. After all, we do not want to tell web visitors about your business or organization – we want to SHOW them. Finally, we take down the set and get back to the studio. Post-production (editing, motion graphics, music) is the next step.

If you’d like to view a few recent completed video productions – I’d like to invite you to watch our video demo reel.

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If you have  a specific video production project which you’d like to discuss feel free to contact us and we’d be happy to provide you with a quote or video production price list.